A Lesson from Nelly – I am #1

No. 1 Pin Acoustic Guitar

ARTICLE: Overcoming the Stigma of Dementia

Today I read the interesting article above that hits on several points that we’ve definitely experienced as well as pointing out a different way of thinking about things. The unique perspective in this article notes that man dementia patients feel let down by their communities, feel misunderstood, scared, and have a lowered sense of self-esteem due to how society stereotypes people with the disease. Their opinions and conversations are “discounted and dismissed.” I know this happens with Jorge and it’s hard when there is mental damage. The article also emphasizes other things we’ve seen with Jorge – the need to accomplish something and performing daily activities. The author highlights that all people feel better about themselves when they have a sense of their own worth and importance and that everyone feels the need to accomplish or do something valuable. So we need to help find ways for Jorge to achieve this each day.

The other thing that was really interesting about this article is it talked about seeing caregiving help. That’s a hard topic because like the author iterates no one wants to abandon their loved ones. She talks about how it’s better to setup care giving and look for adult day cares early on in the diagnosis because change is more readily accepted then. She also recognizes like in most situations – like ours – the caregiving search doesn’t happen until the the middle stages when caregiving becomes more difficult. She offers comfort though. Whenever adjustments happen, whether introducing a new caregiver or a new environment, the key is to help your family member or friend connect with the new situation so they begin to associate feelings of safety, happiness, and comfort with it. They may not remember the person or place or people’s names, but the feelings are being stored in their brain and they will recognize “safety and companionship and they respond to that.” She also mentions how singing and music help with this process. We know Jorge loves music and all the articles I read emphasize this. Music and songs (what she calls rhythmic responses) need less mental processing and music is usually a positive trigger for people. The Garcia family is very musically talented and is always singing and playing instruments so I think that’s why music is a very strong positive stimuli for Jorge.

The final item that I found interesting is this – “thanks to the amygdala, that adjustment period is often shorter than most people expect.” I think this is encouraging. It may take Jorge a little while to adapt to new situations and we’re scared because we don’t want a bad reaction and it’s hard to explain his situation to society, but because he is storing positive feelings we just need to focus on helping recreate those feelings until he becomes comfortable. We saw this with Jorge and how quickly a new caregiver has helped and become his friend.

So we’re just going to keep playing music!

Minority Demand

United Nations flag

ARTICLE: Suburban Senior Day Cares Cater to Dramatic Ethnic Population Growth

There’s a growing demand for day cares tailored to a niche group of minority adults. As the population of baby boomers keeps aging and the number of Dementia cases continues to rise, the demand for these day cares services continues to grow. The aging baby boomer population is also no longer traditional english speaking, American-raised adults. There is a growing number of culturally diverse individuals that come from all different backgrounds. Spanish. Chinese. Japanese. Russian. Groups that not only speak different languages (often with little to no understanding of English), but who also enjoy different activities. Music, interests, and activities they’re familiar with may be different. These individuals need care personalized to help them and better understand their needs.

In our experience, we’ve had issues finding a day care center where Dad feels comfortable and where the nurses can understand and meet his needs. As a human being he wants to be understood and this has been a challenge. It’s already difficult as some of his language skills and understanding declines, but then to add the complexity of him not understanding English makes it impossible for him to partake and understand the English instructed activities. We haven’t been able to find a Spanish speaking day care center in Atlanta. We did find one in Ft. Lauderdale and Miami, but these cities aren’t the only ones with Spanish speaking populations anymore.

It’s also been difficult finding centers that ease the burden for the caretakers. The centers near us only have activities and support until 3PM. If my brother and I work until 6 what are we supposed to do? There’s a need for centers that are available during business hours – just like how child care centers are open a little before and a little after the traditional 9-5 work hours.

We’ll continue to look for the right fit for Dad.

– Pedro

Toys for Entertaining Dementia Patients

Stacking CupsTambourine

We had a lunch and learn at work today about innovation and diversity. The main points were innovation comes from blending diverse ideas together. Two existing but unique ideas when combined together can create something innovative. Another point was coming up with lots of ideas. Not all are going to work well, so constantly come up with ideas and combining different ideas and eventually one should stick. And the final point was about the process of getting to a great idea. Most great ideas or new innovative products don’t come about in one grand action or plan. Most ideas form after small iterative attempts to create something great or to solve a problem. Often taking the smallest step is the hardest but the first in creating the great and innovative solution.

So during the lunch and learn I kept thinking about all the ideas Pedro has come up with to help with his dad and tried to determine what the smallest steps are that we can take to help his dad. Yesterday we were hanging out with Rachel and Mateo and some small comment made him grumpy and we didn’t have a great way to help him become happy again. So I was thinking about toys and games or something that could distract him and make him happy. So what are some toys out there or toys we could create as a first step in helping increase his happiness.

Here are some ideas I found on the internet or thought would be good to invest in.

Since many of these are kids toys I’m going to reach out to my family and see if they have toys my younger siblings and I are now to old to play with. These can probably also be easily found at garage sales which traditionally have lots of children’s items. I’ll report back which items we tried and which ones George enjoys.